Crane Tapestry by Sewcrazy

Summary

Category:
Embroidery & Embellishments
Pattern:
Status:
Complete
Started:
2012-03-11T00:00:00Z
Finished:
2012-05-16T00:00:00Z
Tutorial:
None

Description

This is the Anita Goodesign Crane tapestry.  It will be without the geisha, but hopefully with the outer border from the geisha quilt.

 

Pictures

Loves

Comments

Sewcrazy

I've now got 38 of the 64 panels stitched out. The panels are pinned together so I can check for continuity of the colors across panels. So far, so good and I'm ahead of schedule!

Sewcrazy

Finished embroidering all 64 panels. The machine logged 85 hours for the stitching which is just the time the machine is actually running. It doesn't count, changing thread colors, trimming appliques, changing the bobbin, etc. Now on to construction....

Sewcrazy

Here is a photo of the 64 panels. They are just pinned together at this point to check for continuity. I thought I should take a photo before I start unpinning it to sew the panels together. As you can see, it covers the top of a queen size bed. I'm currently planning to put 3 borders in graduating sizes using the light, med and dark fabrics. So far, I'm quite pleased with how it looks.

Rebecca

Wow! Very impressive. I think the three pink borders will be perfect!

Sewcrazy

Thanks. I just got the 1st 4 panels together. I'm pressing the seams open since there are so many layers. A good shot of steam makes them lay nice and flat. If I do 1 group of 4 per day, that's 16 days, so I'd still be ahead of schedule. When approached in small increments, a very large project becomes a whole lot easier to wrap your head around. None of this is "hard" to do. It just takes a little patience and perseverence.

Sewcrazy

This was completed 6 weeks ahead of schedule! I'm very happy with the results. I ended up not putting any borders on it. I had put the first border on it and auditioned the other two then decided it didn't look right, so I removed the border. The border strips became the binding.

In answer to the usual questions I get: The embroidery machine logged 85 hours of embroidery time (which is just the needle going up and down in the fabric. It doesn't include changing thread colors or trimming appliques, hooping, etc).
I would estimate it took about 15000 meters of thread (I buy 5000 meter spools, and was using 4 colors).
All together, I've probably got about 200 hours into this. It's the biggest, most complicated embroidery project I've done, but then, sometimes you need a challenge to grow your skills.

Chrissybugs

Wow! I am so impressed. I've never tackled a design like this. It's amazing. What kind of machine do you have? It's amazing how you matched everything when you sewed the parts together. Were the quilting stitches part of the design or did you do those after?

True

This is amazing and I do not mean to be stupid but how does this work? Is the design on fabric and your then embroider it or is it fabric with nothing on it and you embroider all the designs? Do I even make sense?

Sewcrazy

For Chrissybugs:This was completely done on a Pfaff Creative Vision. There are lots of layers for the top. The base fabric (burgundy) has a layer of iron-on interfacing first. I hooped a cutaway stabilizer since it has to be REALLY stable to put so many stitches on a block and not have it draw up. It's this shrinkage that would make it hard to get all the panels to match up when they are sewn together. That's the only tricky part to the embroidery. The echo quilting is part on the embroidery design, so it's only on the top. I contemplated going over it with monofiliment thread after I had layered the quilt, but settled for a stitch-in-the ditch of the panels because even that was a challenge with the size, weight and stiffness of the quilt.

Sewcrazy

For True: This is a purchased set of digitized designs from Anita Goodesigns. In the embroidery world, these are called "tile scenes". This is the 3rd tile scene I've done from them. The 3 fabrics are Krystal from Michael Miller in burgundy and two shades of pink. It's sort of an all-over mottled print that reads as solid. The 2 pink colors are appliqued to the burgunday background in the course of stitching each panel. As mentioned in an earlier comment, my machine logged 85 hours of embroidery time during this project. I had jotted down the time values at the start and end of the embroidery since I seem to always be asked that question. This also has about 15,000 meters of embroidery thread, so pretty much everything you see is embroidered. Most people cringe at that amount of thread, but they buy thread at Joanne's for $3 for a 250m spool. I get 5000m spool for ~$6 each, so this project has <$20 of thread, which for the size of the project, is not too bad.

I find that many people still think of "grandma's old Singer" when sewing machines are mentioned. They have no idea how these machines have evolved. Of course the price tag has evolved too. If you can, visit a full-support dealer and look at the top-of-the-line machines. They will amaze you!

Chrissybugs

3 colors of fabric. So, there is applique involved? And the pattern leaves a staright seam allowance?

True

Sewcrazy thank you so much for taking the time to explain this to me! It is amazing and I had no clue you could do something like this on a machine. Quite beautiful and incredible...and the times and thread WOW!

Sewcrazy

Each of the designs is a rectangle. It actually stitches out the rectangle that is your sewing line for construction. You just sew on the "dotted" line. In the design set, you can choose what size you want to make based on what hoops you have available for your machine. This happens to be the largest size in the set. If I had wanted to use a different machine (I have several ), I would have chosen a different size. The 2 previous tile scenes I've done were on a different machine. There are two more in my project queue, but they will be smaller.

The cranes and the flowers/leaves are two different shades of pink appliqued to the burgundy background fabric. It's all part of the design. It gives you a placement line, you place the fabric, it stitches it down, you trimit, and then it continues with the rest of the embroidery. Standard in-the-hoop applique. It's the same process for the dragon tote. The embroidery part of the project is very straight forward. I think the difficulty for most people would be in choosing the right stabilizers.
You can also make incredible lace with an embroidery machine. It's one of my favorite things to do. You use water soluble stabilizer, stitch out the design and then dissolve the stabilizer leaving just the thread. There are some incredibly talented digitizers out there. They are the real talent. I'm just really good at pushing the buttons on the machines. 8-)

Cowgirl4ever

My goodness this is just amazing!! Beautiful. I have this same design and the Geisha. My husband loves Japanese Art from the time that he was stationed in Atsugi, Japan. I bought these in the hopes of suprising him with this. He knows I have the pattern. The suprise will be when its finished.

Sewcrazy

For Cowgirl4ever: I also have the Geisha design. To make the 64 block Crane tapestry, you use the outermost panels from the Geisha set around the entire Crane tapestry set. I've seen at least 3 of the Geisha stitched out. They were all amazing. You can do just the Geisha as a small wall hanging. It would be a much more managable project.

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