Machine Trapunto by Cinda

Summary

Category:
Quilting
Pattern:
Status:
Complete
Started:
1996-11-01T00:00:00Z
Finished:
1996-12-31T00:00:00Z
Tutorial:
None

Description

Thought I'd start by adding one of my few quilt projects that is actually finished!! This was a class I took from Sue Cox in November 1996. We used water soluble thread and thick batting to outline the "puffed" design, then we cut away the batting outside the design and added a thin batting for the entire quilt; we then quilted around the design and stippled everything outside the design with regular quilting thread. Submersing it in water caused the first thread to dissolve so you were just left with the final quilting. Sue also showed us her unique way of creating a floating border (the red in my quilt) and mitered borders and binding. Reference used for class was Trapunto by Machine by Hari Walner.

Pictures

Loves

Azjune

Comments

True

Wow this is amazing...thanks for the details how it was done!

Cinda

True Traditional Trapunto requires slicing the back of the quilt and pushing stuffing into the design to get the puffed-out look, then sewing it closed again. Its just amazing what tools people think up (water-soluble thread!)!

Sewexcitedquilts

Very nice. Did you like the process? Would you make another one?

Cinda

Sewexcitedquilts I would probably make another one. I love the overall effect of Trapunto. I haven't done much free-motion quilting so find that a bit of a challenge (I get too tense). The idea of doing a large quilt would be a bit daunting, but if you take frequent breaks, and of course, with practice, it wouldn't be too bad. I would definitely start with stippling where perfection doesn't count as much (you see my thread matches the background color) before moving to some of these STUNNING machine quilted pieces I've see. Would love to make one of those, but I expect I'll have to be content just marveling over them.

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